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Shuskee

japanese folk tales are highly excellent

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so I got my hands on an anthology of japanese folk tales and they are, as the title suggests, highly excellent. I shall use this thread to enshrine the very best of them, for your education and benefit

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9. The Gift Child of the Gods
Once there was a childless couple. They wanted a child, but no matter how much they wished for one, they did not receive one. Since there seemed nothing else to do, they decided to put their faith in the kami. They received a revelation because they believed earnestly and were devoutly united in their faith. They were told, "If you sleep with a hatchet by your pillow, you will have a child." They had their child, such as it was, according to the word of the kami. Although one of its hands was normal, the other was a hatchet.

The parents could not help worrying even though their child was one especially granted to them, for as he grew bigger and they put him out in the yard to play, he would only fight with his friends and injure them with his ax hand. The parents could not let matters stand even though their child had been given them by the kami because of their faith. They talked it over and decided to take him to the hills and abandon him.

One day the father took his child with him to the hills. The mulberry trees were loaded with ripe red berries. The man said to his son, "Climb a mulberry tree and eat berries while I go over there to piss." The child was happy as he climbed the tree, but his father took that time to leave him and go home.

After that a demon came to eat the boy, but the boy killed him.

The rest of the story is forgotten.

Iwakura Ichiro
Kikaijima, Kagoshima

 

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25. The Clam Wife
Once upon a time there was an unmarried man. A lovely bride came to his place from somewhere. He set out for work every morning and returned in the evening. After his bride came, the taste of his food greatly improved-the bean soup he had made before had never once tasted good, but now it was fine. He was mystified by how she was able to make such good soup.

One day he pretended to go to work, but he hid behind his house to see. His bride got out her earthenware bowl and put lumps of bean paste into it and started to crush them. When the paste was smooth, she spread her legs apart and urinated onto it. The man was furious and drove her right away. His bride tried to apologize, but he would not forgive her. Then she turned into a big
clam and started to move slowly away. The bean soup was good because it had clam juice in it.

Mukaiyama Masashige
Kamiina-gun, Nagano

🍜

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43. The River that Rose Each Day
Once there was an older sister who was a stepchild and a younger sister who was the daughter of the stepmother. The stepmother abused her stepchild, but the two girls liked each other. Finally, the stepmother abandoned the older girl in the river that rose each day. The younger girl carried food to her sister every day and asked how far the water had risen. She would ask, "How far up has the water come today?" The answer would be, "It has come as far as my abdomen."

The water gradually came to her chest and then to her neck. Finally she died.

Koyama Masao
Chiisagata-gun, Nagano

 

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47. The Stepmother a Ghost
There was once a mean stepmother in a certain place. A boy of about 12 or 13 years of age, who was the son of a former wife, lived at her home. He had done well in his studies, but after his mother died he was always falling asleep in class and he made no progress in his studies. His teacher wondered why. When he scolded the boy, he cried and told the teacher about his troubles. That night the teacher stood secretly outside the door of the boy's home to look things over.

Late in the night, when even the plants seemed to be asleep, the stepmother dressed herself in white and let her hair down, all dishevelled. She held a luke-warm piece of konyaku in her mouth and went close to the child. She said, "I am your dead mother." Then she seemed to lick the boy all over to torment him. The teacher who saw all this informed the police immediately. The stepmother was punished.

Suchi-gun, Shizuoka

:freudwoop:

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58. "Hold Fast or Stick Fast"
Once upon a time there was a very honest man in a certain place. When he was coming home from the hills along a path one night, a voice shouted from the big tree directly above him, "I want to jump onto you. I want to jump onto you." The old man was not in the least frightened. He promptly shouted back, "Jump away!" Something came falling onto the old man's back
with a jangle. He could not get it off easily, but it seemed to be something like a box. When he reached home, he lifted the lid to see.

It was full of little gold coins. His household suddenly became very wealthy.

The bad old man living next door heard about what had happened and wanted to get coins for himself. When he was below that cryptomeria tree, something came flying onto him. He went home smiling and called, "Old woman, bring a light." His old wife lighted a pine torch hurriedly. When she came close, she saw pine pitch on her old man's back. It caught fire and the old man burned to death.

Moriguchi Seiichi
Arita-gun, Wakayama

 

  • Dugong 1

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Wow these hipsters sure love their nonlinear narratives

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It was a cold night
And the snow lay low
I pulled my coat tight
Came home and sat right down
And the soup was all
And the soup was all down
And the soup was all
And the soup was all down

I am a poor man
I haven't wealth nor fame
I have my two eyes
And hid by the window frame
And I watched her so
And I watched her so long
And I watched her so
And I watched her so long

And all the stars were crashing 'round
As I laid eyes on what I'd found

She spread her legs wide
She was a lovely thing
Out came a yellow stream
Into the paste of bean

And it splashed and shone
And it splashed and shone so
And it splashed and shone
And it splashed and shone so

And all the stars were crashing 'round
As I laid eyes on what I'd found

My clam wife, my clam wife
My clam wife, my clam wife

 
Now I leapt out
And I dressed her down
And how I yelled at her
Before the steaming bowl

And she slowly moved
And she slowly moved away
And she slowly moved
She slowly moved away

And all the stars crashing 'round
As I laid eyes on what I'd found
My clam wife, my clam wife
My clam wife, my clam wife

My clam wife arrived at my door in the moonlight
All star bright and tongue-tied I took her in
We were married and soup was sweet for our wedding
And our bedding was ready when we fell in
 
Taste the clam pee
From the earthenware
Rich as cassoulet
The flavour of the fare
When all I ever meant to do was to keep you

My clam wife
My clam wife
My clam wife

I was poorly
My cooking tasting dourly
And how she loved me
She could bring it back
But I was picky
I was vain and I forced her to leaving
On cold hearth, with a bland broth, I'm alone

 
Taste the clam pee
From the earthenware
Rich as cassoulet
The flavour of the fare
When all I ever meant to do was to keep you

My clam wife
My clam wife

 
There's a bean in the soup and it rakes at my heart
There is pee in the soup and it rakes at my heart

My clam wife

 

Edited by Frog
  • Dugong 2

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10 hours ago, Shuskee said:

After that a demon came to eat the boy, but the boy killed him.

what a fucking twist

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10 hours ago, Shuskee said:

Then she seemed to lick the boy all over to torment him.

I mean that has to tickle like there's no tomorrow. Poor kid :emo:

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8 hours ago, Frog said:

Wow these hipsters sure love their nonlinear narratives

 

is it me or does that poem read exactly like a decemberist song?

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check out the plot twist on this thing

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95. The Thousand Ri Boots

Once there was a poor family where the father had died and left his wife to care for their three little boys eleven, nine, and seven years old. The mother worked as hard as she could, but a single woman could barely earn enough to feed herself, and she could not possibly take good care of the three children. It frightened her to see their misery.

The mother finally decided to abandon her children in the hills. She thought that perhaps an animal would find them there and devour them to settle her problem. One day she took the three little boys with her far back into the hills. She said, "Wait here for a while. Mother will go to buy some cakes and come back soon." She deceived them in this way and abandoned them.

The children believed their mother and waited, but after a while it began to grow dark, and for some reason their mother did not come back. The two older boys could not bear it any longer and they began to sob.

The seven-year-old said, "There's no use in crying, brothers. Maybe we can find a man's house around here who will let us spend the night. I'll climb a tree to look."

He climbed a tree nearby and saw a fire burning beyond. He said, "I see a fire burning over there. Let's walk."

The boy climbed down and urged his two brothers along. They came to a single dilapidated hut in the midst of the hills. An old woman was building a good fire on the hearth.

The children went into the house and said, "We have lost our way. Please let us spend the night here." The old woman answered, "I would like to let you stay, but my house is a demon's house, and it's about time for him to come home. I can't possibly let you stay. If you take this road, you will meet the demon, but if you take that one, you will be safe. Please hurry." She showed the boys the road to take, but they did not want to leave. They said it was dark and they couldn't go home. They insisted upon staying. She asked them if they were willing to have the demon eat them, but even as she talked, they could hear the tread of the approaching demon.

The old woman was flustered. She said, "Look, while you are wasting time, here he comes. What shall I do? Come, get into here." She put the three children into a pit in the room with a dirt floor, covered it with its lid and a piece of straw matting. That was just in time, for the demon was coming in by the back door as she finished. He began to sniff around and said, "Granny, I smell human beings! You surely have put somebody up here." He hunted all through the house.

The worried old woman said, "To tell the truth, three human children came to the front door and wanted to spend the night here. Just then you came in through the back door and they ran away. That is why you think you smell human beings. It must be the smell of the children is still around."

The demon believed her, but he couldn't stand to think of the children being nearby. He thought that if he hurried, he could catch up with them. He pulled on his 1000 ri boots and rushed out the back door as fast as a bullet shot from a gun. No matter how far he went, he could not see anything like children. He said to himself, "I must have gone beyond where the children are. They will be along presently, so I might as well rest for a while." He sat down at the side of the road and soon he was asleep and snoring loudly because he was tired.

At the demon's house, the old woman helped the children out of the pit as soon as the demon left. She said, "The demon has set out wearing his 1000 ri boots and he has surely gone far away by now. Take this road quickly and escape."

She sent the boys out the back door and away, but for some reason, the boys made a wrong turn and went onto the road the demon had taken. While they were going along, they heard a big noise like thunder. They wondered what it was. Then they saw a big demon asleep by the road and snoring like thunder. The children were frightened and the two older ones began to sob.

The youngest boy said, "There is no use crying, big brothers. Let's pass the demon while he is asleep." He went ahead to look the demon over. When the boy looked at the demon who was sound asleep, he suddenly noticed the demon's feet. Those things he was wearing were the things called 1000 ri boots, for sure. He wanted to get them somehow. He tried to pull one boot off carefully without waking the demon. When he got it off, the demon gave a kick and turned over. The boy held his breath. The demon muttered in his sleep, "Those field mice are setting out for their night's work."

The boy waited until the demon settled down to sleep again, and then he pulled off the other boot. The demon gave another kick and turned over. The boy held his breath as the demon muttered, "Those field mice have come home from their night's work." Then the demon went back to sleep.

The boy took the demon's boots back to his brothers. He told his oldest brother to put the boots on and helped him do it. Then he tied his next brother onto his own back with his sash and he, himself, got onto the back of his oldest brother. "Now fly," he ordered. There was a whirr ing sound as the three flew away like a shot from a gun.

The demon woke up when he heard them take off. "Have those brats escaped?" he said as he gritted his teeth in humiliation. He tried to chase them, but he could not catch up with them because his 1000 ri boots had been stolen. Even as he watched, the children reached a place where there were people's houses. The demon could only go home dejectedly.

When he reached home, the old woman wanted to know about the fate of the children. She asked, "Did you catch the children?" The demon said, "I went a little too far. Somebody stole my boots while I was resting, so I couldn't catch them." She was relieved when she heard that.

The children were able to reach home safely. They worked hard and helped their mother after that.

Dobashi Riki
Nishiyatsushiro-gun, Yamanashi

 

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97. Destroying the Monkey Gods
No matter how many priests were put in charge of Shohoji temple, they were all destroyed by ghosts. The temple was in difficulties because no priest wanted to take charge of it.

An itinerant priest came begging and asked a priest if he could spend the night. The priest said, "I can not let anyone stay, but there is a vacant temple over there. It would be better for you to stay over night there."

The itinerant priest went there to put up for the night and ate what food people nearby brought him. He was satisfied to sleep anywhere he could be protected from rain. When he was ready to go to sleep, he recalled that his teacher had told him before he set out that when he slept in a vacant house, he should be sure to sleep where there was an entrance.

He looked around the kitchen and crawled under a kettle that happened to be there.
In the night he heard a clatter in the main hall and then some things appeared. They gathered in the kitchen. One of them said, "Let's dance before we enjoy our sweet feast tonight." They all agreed and began to dance.

The priest listened closely to the words of their song. It sounded like:

Don't let Denshobo in Tanba
Hear of this, chu, chu, chu.

After the things had sung and danced for a while, they began to walk around, saying, "It smells of a human, it smells of a human." They could not find anyone so they went outside. In the meantime dawn began to come on.

About the time the priest came out from under the kettle, the villagers gathered gradually. They were astonished to see him, for they had expected that the ghosts would have eaten him down to bones, and there he looked as though nothing had happened. They thought the priest, himself, might be a ghost and started to run away.

The priest said, "I am no ghost. There is no need to run away."

The villagers were relieved. They asked, "Didn't anything strange happen last night?"

He answered, "Some things came out in the kitchen and carried on, but I was sleeping and did not see what they were. They shouted that they smelled a human being and then went off."

The villagers said, "Countless priests have been eaten up here, but you must have great power, for you have not been eaten. Please stay and run the temple for us."

The priest answered, "I must go somewhere before that, but I will return." Then he left them. The villagers said, "That priest went off because he was afraid. He just made an excuse to get away."

The priest had heard of Denshobo in the song the ghosts had sung, so he thought they were talking about a priest. He decided to go in search of him. When he arrived in Tanba, he learned that Denshobo was a cat and not a priest. He borrowed it and brought it back with him.

The villagers were happy to see the priest and they turned the temple over to him. Denshobo lived there with the priest, always staying close wherever he walked, never losing sight of him. The priest thought it strange and asked it why it always stayed near him. The cat replied, "The ghosts in this temple are really old rats. If I
left you for a moment, they would eat you." The priest asked, "Will you destroy the rats for me?" The cat said, "I can't destroy them by myself. If my brother cat would come to help, we could destroy them."

The priest then told Denshobo to go and ask his brother to come to help. The cat said that if he left the priest, the rats would eat him. He told him to have somebody draw pictures of cats and put them up in the kitchen and for the priest to stay in the kitchen while he was away. Then the cat set out to ask his brother to help him. The rats would come to the kitchen at night but then run off repeatedly, so that place was safe.

Ten days later the big cat returned with his brother. They hid the priest at night and took the pictures down. The two cats hid and waited. The rats came in the night, but since the pictures of the cats were no longer there, they did not expect trouble.

The two cats came out and the fight began. The cats were powerful, but the rats were powerful, too. There was a great struggle for a while, the cats and rats calling at each other.

The priest was huddled up, hiding in fright. When the noise quieted, he came out and found that the cats as well as the rats were dead. He took the rat legs to make a little stand for his sutra and it is still preserved as a treasure at the temple. He hastened to bury the cats and to offer prayers for their souls. In that way the priest became head of the temple.
Dando harai.

Fujiwara Teijiro
Hienuki-gun, Iwate

When he arrived in Tanba, he learned that Denshobo was a cat and not a priest

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115. The Ghost of the Mountain Pears

An onyudo came out in the autumn while a novice was alone at a temple. It said, "Get the big grinding bowl out, boy." The novice was frightened, but he got out the grinding bowl.

The monster straddled it and defecated a big pile into it. It said, "Now eat it, boy." The novice did not know what would happen if he refused, so he tried to eat it. It had the flavor of pears and really was delicious.

Whenever the priest was away, calling upon patrons, the ghost would be sure to come and make the novice eat his feces. The boy was truly frightened and finally told the priest what was happening. The priest listened to him.

He said, "This is very strange. The next time the onyudo comes, follow it and mark the way it goes." The matter was left that way.

The next time the priest was away, the onyudo came again. He defecated into the grinding bowl as usual and left after he made the boy eat it. The boy was frightened, but he followed the onyudo as he had been told. It went into the mountain behind the temple and disappeared. The novice marked the place with a little branch he broke off and then went home.

He and the priest went the next day to where the stick had been set to look around. There was an odor of decaying pears coming from somewhere. This seemed unusual, and they went farther into the mountain to search. They found a huge old mountain pear tree with fruit that had fallen year after year and lay in a decaying mound at
its base. It had transformed itself and had come to the temple.

The priest and his novice cleared up the place, sweeping below the tree and then purifying it. The onyudo never came back to the temple after that.

Sasaki Kizen
Shiwa-gun, Iwate

 

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out-of-context japanese folktale sentence of the month:

The villagers were excited and said, "That mouth-ghost and the penis-ghost are running together."

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171. The Horse That Dropped Coins


Once upon a time a horse dealer came leading a cow and said, "This cow drops gold. Would you like to buy it?" A man who heard him thought he could make money on the cow and bought it for a big price right away. Several days went by without the cow's dropping gold. Then the buyer went to the horse dealer to see about it.

The dealer said, "If you do not feed the cow gold, it will not drop gold."

Kashiyama Kaichi
Kumano, Wakayama

Japanese folklore is full of wondrous creatures, such as horse dealers that sell cows

 

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179. Red Rice and the Child
Once upon a time a poor man lived with his child in a little rented hut. They ate only red rice (a rice of poor quality that matures early) because they could not afford the ordinary kind.

When the child went to play at the landlord's house, he was asked, "What do you eat at home?"

The child replied "red rice." [Red rice is the name given glutinous rice steamed with red beans for festive occasions.]

The landlord said, "My red beans are disappearing a little at a time these days. It must be your father's doings." He went immediately to the poor man's hut to drive him out. The father finally cut open his child's stomach to show what was in it to prove his innocence. Only a poor quality of red rice was there. The landlord was so full of remorse that he committed suicide.

Nobody grew red rice again in that place.

Takatori Teruo
Okayama

lmao brütal

Edited by Shuskee
  • Dugong 1

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176. The Child Judge
A bride and her mother-in-law gave birth to babies at the same time. After they had put them in the same tub at the same time to wash them, they could not decide which baby was which. One baby was a boy and the other was a girl, but each woman said she had given birth to a boy.

Since the women could not agree, they took the matter to Judge Ooka to arbitrate. The judge was puzzled over a good way to solve the dispute. He went on an impulse to fish at the river. Three children were playing there. He went near them to see what they were playing. They were playing court.

The child who was a little bigger than the others was playing Ooka and the other two were the disputants. They were arguing about there not being ten "tsu" in counting from one to ten because to [ten] did not end in "tsu". This was in the form of a riddle. The child who played judge said the itsutsu [five] had two "tsu" so the extra one could be given to to. Then there would be enough "tsu" for each.

Next, the children played bride and mother-in-law. They pretended they had delivered babies together. They had washed them hurriedly in the same basin, and discovered one was a boy and the other a girl. Each woman declared her baby was a boy. They brought their dispute to Ooka to arbitrate.

The judge agreed, "Each of you milk your breasts and bring me what you have."

The children pretended to milk their breasts. They took turns using the same bowl. The judge weighed each bowlful and said, "The mother-in-law's milk is heavier than the bride's. The mother who gives birth to a son has heavier breasts, so the boy baby belongs to the mother-in-law."

The real judge looked on at this from the thicket where he was hiding. When the children ~topped their play and went away, he wondered where they lived and followed them far back into the mountains. They went into a big house there.

The judge went in, too, to see, but there was no sign of the children who had just gone in. He thought it strange as he looked around the place. He noticed that although the house was large, it had only a single pillar in the center. This surprised him. Although he called, nobody answered, so he went home. He went to the bride and her mother-in-law who had the problem and settled the question as the children had done.

The judge recalled the house with a single pillar later and invented the umbrella. The three children were deities.

Sasaki Kizen
Iwate

You thought this was leading up to some Solomon shit? WRONG BITCH. IT WAS AN UMBRELLA ORIGIN MYTH. IT WAS AN UMBRELLA ORIGIN MYTH ALL ALONG.

Edited by Shuskee
  • Dugong 1

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when you want to write an umbrella origin myth and you end up thinking of a pretty good twist for solomon but you want to finish your umbrella origin myth

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197. Two Mouths, an Upper and a Lower

A man from Yonezato was coming home from Kesen with a load of fish on his horse. The sun set when he had gotten as far as Omata in Ubaishi. He wondered where he could put up for the night.

The man took his load down from his horse and built up a fire. Although it was still early in the evening, a young woman walked by with a bundle tied in a furoshiki on her back. She looked like somebody from his neighborhood, the girl who had gone as a bride to Kesen.

The man asked her, "What happened?"

The girl said, "My mother-in-law is so mean that I cry all the time. I can't stand it any longer, so I'm running away tonight."

The man felt sorry for her. He tried to comfort her, and gave her wha t was left of his food.

In the meantime, the girl's behavior began to seem strange. She sent amorous glances toward the man. He did not recall that she was that sort, and he thought it was unusual that she should be acting like this, but he did not show how he felt. The girl came up to the fire and exposed her white shins, then her private parts, and then lay down on her side.

This was becoming too suspicious for the man to endure, but he still looked on without showing how he felt. He noticed that her private parts were strangely formed. As he looked, they moved. A mouth opened and yawned two or three times.

Then the man caught on. He grabbed a burning stick from the fire and struck the woman with it. She rolled over and shrieked as she got up. Suddenly the part with the bundle began to run away and the part below was knocked over.

The girl had been two badgers disguised.

Sasaki Kizen

Esashi-gun, Iwate

 

what sort of vincent adultman shenanigans were going on in rural japan, and also what was the badgers' endgame scenario here

Edited by Shuskee

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Since our Potato Scribe has neglected his duties, I see fit to fill the void with ANTHROPOLOGICAL TALES COLLECTED BY DAVID GRAEBER
 

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[]Early medieval Irish law:

"if stung by another man's bee, one must calculate the extent of the injury, but also, if one swatted it in the process, subtract the replacement value of the bee"

 

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[]Relatedly, 19th century knife-fights in the Ionian region:

"One historian who went through fifty years of police reports about knife-fights in nineteenth-century Ionia discovered that virtually every one of them began when one party publicly suggested that the other's wife or sister was a whore."[/]

 

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[]A tale of Nasruddin, the 13th century Seljuq storyteller:

"Nasruddin's neighbor once came by ask if he could borrow his donkey for an unexpected errand. Nasruddin obliged, but the next day the neighbor was back again-he needed to take some grain to be milled. Before long he was showing up almost every morning, barely feeling he needed a pretext. Finally, Nasruddin got fed up, and one morning told him his brother had already
come by and taken the donkey.

Just as the neighbor was leaving he heard a loud braying sound from the yard.
"Hey, I thought you said the donkey wasn't here! "
"Look, who are you going to believe ?" asked Nasruddin. "Me, or some animal? "[/]

 

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[]Another day, Nasruddin and his pots:

One day Nasruddin's neighbor, a notorious miser, came by to announce he was throwing a party for some friends . Could he borrow some of Nasruddin' s pots ? Nasruddin didn't have many but said he was happy to lend whatever he had. The next day the miser returned , carrying Nasruddin's three pots, and
one tiny additional one.

"What's that?" asked Nasrudddin.
"Oh, that's the offspring [in Greek and other languages, the same word as 'interest'] of the pots. They reproduced during the time they were with me. "

Nasruddin shrugged and accepted them, and the miser left happy that he had established a principle of interest. A month later Nasruddin was throwing a party, and he went over to
borrow a dozen pieces of his neighbor's much more luxurious crockery. The miser complied. Then he waited a day. And then another . . .

On the third day, the miser came by and asked what had happened to his pots .
"Oh, them?" Nasruddin said sadly. "It was a terrible tragedy. They died."[/]

 

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[]Ulpian, 2nd century AD, on Roman law:

if some persons were playing ball and one of them, hitting the ball quite hard, knocked it against a barber's hands, and in this way the throat of a slave, whom the barber was shaving, was cut by a razor pressed against it, then who is the person with whom the culpability lay is liable under the Lex Aquilia [the law of civil damages]? Proclus says that the culpability lies with the barber; and indeed, if he was shaving at a place where games are normally played or where traffic was heavy, there is reason to fault him. But it would not be badly held that if someone entrusts himself to a barber who has a chair in a dangerous place, he should have himself to blame.[/]

 

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[]Greeks who strategically sold themselves into slavery to obtain Roman citizenship, 1st century AD:

it was not uncommon for educated Greeks to have themselves sold into slavery to some wealthy Roman in need of a secretary, entrust the money to a close friend or family member, and then, after a certain interval, buy themselves back, thus obtaining Roman citizenship. This despite the fact that, during such time as they were slaves, if their owner decided to, say, cut one of his secretary's feet off, legally, he would have been perfectly free to do so.[/]

 

 

 

 

 

Edited by The Ghost of Veggius van Bronckhorst

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234. The Child with a Long Name

Once when a child was born to a couple, they talked over what to call him. They decided that a short name would be easy to call, and they called him Chotto ["a short time"]. But he died in a short time. He must have died soon because his name was too short.

The parents decided, "Next time we will give a long name. That way our child will surely live a long time." They named their next child Itchogiri-nichogiri-chonai-chosaburo-gorogoro-heiji-atchiyamakotchiyama-tori-no-tokkasa-tate-eboshi-tongarabyo.

Then one day while the child with a long name was playing in the yard, he stumbled and fell into the well. A little child who saw him fall in wanted to rescue him. He went to a house nearby to borrow a ladder. He said, "Itchogiri-nichogiri-chonai-chosaburo-gorogoro-heiji-atchiyamakotchiyama-tori-no-tokkasa-tate-eboshi-tongarabyo has fallen into the well, so please lend me a ladder."

The old woman here was hard of hearing and he had to repeat that long name for her before he could bring the ladder. By that time the child with a long name had swallowed water and drowned.

Fumino Shirakoma [Iwakura Ichiro]
Minamikanbara-gun, Niigata

Edited by Shuskee
  • Dugong 1

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(stories with dead children are my favourite)

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303. The Long Radish, The Carrot, and the Burdock
A burdock, a carrot, and a long radish went on a pilgrimage to Ise. While they were stopping at an inn, the carrot and the radish talked about getting away from the burdock because it was too black. They slipped away while the burdock was still asleep. When he woke up, he noticed that the carrot and the long radish were not there. He asked the innkeeper about them.

The man said, "Mr. Carrot and Mr. Long Radish have already started ["to go to seed" or "early"].
Ogasa-gun, Shizuoka

 

Mr. Carrot and Mr. Long Radish later became Templars, for they liked shit puns and were very racist

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wow look at this PRIVILIGED VEGGIE telling OTHER VEGGIES what their COLOUR IS

  • Dugong 2

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You ain't real black veg til you've been registered by the Veggie Census, run by god-fearing pale vegs

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